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More About “h”

As we continue the discussion about convective heat transfer, it is useful to define two types of convection, natural and forced. When quantities of fluids are moved in either way, we also use the term “bulk energy transfer” because it is really the movement of the fluid itself, and the energy inherent in it, that […]

“h” or the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient

When heat transfer occurs in fluids—defined simply as non-solids—the rate and total transfer are governed by several factors, two of which are easily known: temperature difference and area. More challenging to define precisely is “h” or the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient. This all-important variable is the amalgamation of a number of influences on heat transfer […]

Convective Heat Transfer

As thermography professionals, we must be well grounded in the basics of heat transfer. If not, we’ll make mistakes in understanding, interpreting, and presenting our data. If you don’t feel 100% confident in your understanding, I urge you to move in that direction and will offer these posts as simple starting points.

Convection happens in […]

Fall is in the Air (and everything else), Part Three

As I’ve written about over the past two weeks, there are a number of factors that determine what the temperature of a surface will be beside the energy inherent to it. We need to understand them so that we can make a valid analysis of what is really going on.

As an example, imagine an abnormally […]

Fall is in the Air (and the Wind), Part Two

Last week we focused on the affect radiational cooling and heating has on surface temperature. If you still have any doubts about this, just go outside in the sun and again on a clear night and observe the great variation of temperatures you find on your thermal images. Many of them are related to radiation.

When […]