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How To Test Surface Temperatures With A Thermal Imager

To watch this video, click on the Ti125:

Ti125 Thermal Imaging Made Easy

Ti125 Thermal Imaging Made Easy


 

3 comments to How To Test Surface Temperatures With A Thermal Imager

  • John C

    Hi I’ve been asked to prepare a procedure to do a thermal image survey of Schneider LV 5000A bar duct protected to IP54, I have asked advice from Schneider but recevied none except to say I must not remove the IP protection covers.
    Has anyone any advice please.
    Cheers
    John C

  • Fluke Thermography

    Hi John,

    As you likely know, thermal imaging must have direct line-of-sight to the objects under inspection. This obviously means that you cannot see through walls, enclosure panels… or bus duct covers.

    However, you may often still be able to conduct effective inspections of high-amperage bus duct systems with an appropriate thermal imager, proper training in infrared thermography, and knowledge of the busbar and bus duct system construction.

    You will not be viewing the busbar directly when the bus duct /cover cannot be removed. When this is the case, you can still scan the length of the bus duct for unexpected temperature anomalies (rises) that may be indicative of areas of concern inside. What you need to understand is that there may be a very large thermal gradient between the actual temperature on the busbar itself (when a problem exists), and the apparent temperature of the outside surface of the bus duct that you are able to see with your thermal imager. It could be hot enough to melt copper on the busbar or connections… but only be showing a 2-3C temperature rise from ambient on the outside of the bus ductwork. Because of this, it is important to note even small temperature changes in situations such as this, as they could be indicative of bigger problems inside.

    If you have not taken a Level 1 or Level 2 Thermography class from The Snell Group, you may wish to consider this to further your practical knowledge in the field. They have been performing infrared inspections, consulting, and providing internationally-recognized quality training for thermographers for well over 30 years. They can be found at http://www.thesnellgroup.com . You should also check for additional information and colleague recommendations on http://www.IRTALK.com, the Snell Group’s online forum of all things thermography.

    Best,
    Fluke Thermography

  • Fluke Thermography

    Hi John,

    As you likely know, thermal imaging must have direct line-of-sight to the objects under inspection. This obviously means that you cannot see through walls, enclosure panels… or bus duct covers.

    However, you may often still be able to conduct effective inspections of high-amperage bus duct systems with an appropriate thermal imager, proper training in infrared thermography, and knowledge of the busbar and bus duct system construction.

    You will not be viewing the busbar directly when the bus duct /cover cannot be removed. When this is the case, you can still scan the length of the bus duct for unexpected temperature anomalies (rises) that may be indicative of areas of concern inside. What you need to understand is that there may be a very large thermal gradient between the actual temperature on the busbar itself (when a problem exists), and the apparent temperature of the outside surface of the bus duct that you are able to see with your thermal imager. It could be hot enough to melt copper on the busbar or connections… but only be showing a 2-3C temperature rise from ambient on the outside of the bus ductwork. Because of this, it is important to note even small temperature changes in situations such as this, as they could be indicative of bigger problems inside.

    If you have not taken a Level 1 or Level 2 Thermography class from The Snell Group, you may wish to consider this to further your practical knowledge in the field. They have been performing infrared inspections, consulting, and providing internationally-recognized quality training for thermographers for well over 30 years. They can be found at http://www.thesnellgroup.com . You should also check for additional information and colleague recommendations on http://www.IRTALK.com, the Snell Group’s online forum of all things thermography.

    Best,
    Fluke Thermography

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